Elise Miller-Hooks
GMU


A System-of-Systems Approach to Creating Resilient Transportation Systems given Interdependencies with Other Critical Lifelines

Project 45

A transportation network is a critical lifeline for a community, essential to the functioning of society and the viability of the economy. The wellbeing of the community's members depends on their mobility, ability to move goods, and access to services. Having a resilient transportation infrastructure system that performs well under multiple hazard situations is critical to a community. A transportation system is a complex, multi-modal system consisting, among other modes, of rail, highway, air, and maritime networks, and ports or other intermodal connections which link such networks. Moreover, transportation networks are inherently interconnected with other critical lifelines, including power, telecommunications, water, sanitation, and building infrastructure networks, which are themselves complex systems. This work develops a deeper understanding of the effects of interactions between critical infrastructure lifelines (including water, wastewater, power, natural gas, communications and cyber) and transportation systems. It further investigates the role of these interdependencies in transportation system resilience, and develops resilience quantification tools that account for the impact that arises from these interdependencies on resilience level.

Award Period:
2015 - 2016
Source of Funding:
USDOT, National Transportation Center (NUTC), UMD
Role:
PI on this subaward, co-PI on NUTC
Co-PI:
Total Award Amount:
$120,000 for subaward

Project 47

 



Elise Miller-Hooks, Ph.D.
Professor
Bill & Eleanor Hazel Chair in Infrastructure Engineering

Phone: 703.993.1685
Email: miller@gmu.edu

Office: 4614 Nguyen Engineering Building

Address:
Sid and Reva Dewberry Department of Civil, Environmental and Infrastructure Engineering
George Mason University
4400 University Drive, MS 6C1
Fairfax, VA 22030
USA


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